Invasive Insects

According to National Invasive Species Management Plan, an invasive species is "a species that is non-native to the ecosystem under consideration and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health." This definition was adopted by the New York State Invasive Species Task Force. The Task Force refined the definition stating that to be considered "invasive", a non-native species‛ harm must significantly outweigh any benefits. The New York State Invasive Species Task Force website also provides descriptions of priority invasive species in the area.

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Asian Giant Hornet - The Asian giant hornet and its subspecies the Japanese giant hornet are natural born killers. The insect’s quarter-inch-long stinger is capable of injecting venom powerful enough to dissolve human tissue. The Asian giant hornet has a wide, bright yellow-orange head and compound eyes. Its abdomen is black with thin orange bands.

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Asian Longhorned Beetle - The Asian longhorned Beetle was introduced from Asia to the U.S. with the first breeding populations found in NY State in 1996. It is a wood-boring post that attacks maples and other hardwood trees.

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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug - Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is anative of Eastern Asia and was first detected in Pennsylvania in october 2011. The insects often are found in houses, where they produce an unpleasant smelling chemical. They can be an agricultural pest, threatening apples, pears, peaches, figs, mulberries, citrus, persimmon, and soybeans.

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Emerald Ash Borer - The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an invasive, wood-boring beetle native to Asia that feeds on and eventually kills all species of Ash. The EAB was first found in North America in 2002 near Detroit and since has spread to 13 states and two Canadian provinces, killing hundreds of millions of Ash trees in rural and urban settings. EAB has been found in a number of New York State counties, and a quarantine zone is effect to prevent its further spread.

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Hemlock Woolly Adelgid - The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is an aphis-like insect native to Asia. It was first recognized in the Eastern U.S. in Virginia in 1950's, and reached New York in the 1980's, through it has been present in the Western United States since 1924. The insect targets Eastern and Caroline Hemlock trees.

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Sirex Wood Wasp - Sirex Woodwasp is an invasive insect that attacks pine species, including Scots Pone and Red Pine. It was found in Oswego County in 2004 and since then has spread throughout much of New York State. In its native range of Eurasia and North Africa, Sirex Woodwasp is considered a secondary pest which attacks suppressed and stressed trees. However, where introducecd in the Southern Hemisphere, it attacks pine plantations and causes severe mortality.

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Jumping Worm (Amynthas spp.) - Have you seen an abundance of worms in your garden? If so, look to see if they resemble the worm in the photo. The clitellum or collar goes all the way around the body and is smooth. The worms are very active and have a sheen to them. Look for worm castings around your garden.

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Spotted Lanternfly - The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets has confirmed that the spotted lanternfly, an invasive insect, has been found in multiple counties in New York. The pest targets ailanthus trees, in particular, and attacks a wide variety of crops including grapes, hops, apples, and forest products.

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Spruce Gall Adelgid - Feeding by this adelgid causes 1-3" long green terminal galls that mature to brown. About half of adult female adelgids have wings. This adelgid is mainly a pest of ornamental planting and nursery stock, sometimes damaging Douglas fir.

If you have any questions about invasive species locally or if you think you have an invasive species to identify or report, please contact David Gray Cox at dgc23@cornell.eduor 518-234-4303 (x119) or 296-8310.

Contact

David Cox
Ag Program Leader
dgc23@cornell.edu
518-234-4303 x119

Last updated July 22, 2020